Talcum Powder Lawsuit

Hoch Law Firm, PC is reviewing claims on behalf of women who developed ovarian cancer after using talcum powder or baby powder in their genital area. The products were marketed as and sold by Johnson & Johnson as Johnson’s Baby Powder and Shower to Shower.

More than 20 scientific studies, dating back as far as 1971, have linked talc to ovarian cancer. In 2003, an analysis of 16 of these studies found that women using talcum powder were 33 percent more likely to develop ovarian cancer. These lawsuits allege that Johnson & Johnson knew about the ovarian cancer risk since at least 1982, but failed to warn of the risk to women who used these products.

In 2014, Johnson & Johnson brought in $374 million from sales of talcum products.

There are already a number of lawsuits alleging that Johnson & Johnson failed to warn women about the risk of developing ovarian cancer. Recently, a jury in St. Louis, Missouri awarded a woman $72 million dollars in her suit against Johnson & Johnson. According to the lawsuit, Johnson & Johnson knew about the link between talc powder and cancer since as early as 1982, when a landmark study found that women using these products as personal powders were at a 92 percent increased risk of developing ovarian cancer. Following the study, researchers allegedly recommended that the company place a warning for this risk on its talcum powders. Despite this, Johnson & Johnson’s talc powders do not include any warnings about the risk of developing ovarian cancer.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with ovarian cancer and you believe talcum may be the cause, please contact Hoch Law Firm, PC.

Below is a brief timeline of studies related to the harmful effects of talc:

1971: A study published in The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the British Commonwealth warned that “the potentially harmful effects of talc…in the ovary…should not be ignored. Researchers found talc particles in the cellular tissues of the ovaries of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

1982: The medical journal “Cancer” published a study which showed the first statistical link between feminine hygiene talcum powder and ovarian cancer. This study specifically found that women who used sanitary napkins with talcum powder were three times more likely to develop ovarian cancer when compared to those who didn’t use sanitary napkins with talcum powder.

1992: A study in the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology found that frequent use of baby powder increases a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer threefold.

1997: A study in the American Journal of Epidemiology verified that perineal talcum powder contributes to the risk of developing cancer. The study also suggested that talcum genital deodorant sprays contribute to occurrences of cancer.

2003: A comprehensive analysis of 16 talcum powder studies by Anticancer Research found “statistically significant” data suggesting that feminine hygiene use of talcum increased the risk of developing ovarian cancer by 33%.

2008: Researchers from Harvard University compared 1400 woman with ovarian cancer to 1800 healthy women and found that the use of talcum powder was associated with a 36% increased risk if developing ovarian cancer.

2013: A study by Cancer Prevention Research found that feminine hygiene use of talcum powder was associated with a 20 to 30 percent increased risk of developing ovarian cancer.

2013: The World Health Organization classifies Talc as a “possible human carcinogen.”

Note: These are not the only studies that show a link between talc and cancer. There have been 20 studies since 1982 which show a link between talc and cancer.